"DIY-Tris.com"

A Web Site For Do-It-Yourself Small,

Homemade Trimarans

 

Presented by "Dr. Frank" Smoot, and dedicated to DIY boat builders everywhere!

 

 

The (as-yet-unnamed) "19-Footer"

 

 

Like the 24-footer, LocoMotion, this 19' boat was also inspired by the Everglades Challenge.

Unlike the 24-footer, I can launch and rig this one by myself, and I could even sleep in it in a pinch,

as it has 6 1/2' of uninterrupted open floor space and 26" between the vertical hull sides.

 

I'm not quite ready for the whole 300 or so miles of the EC yet, but the first 120 miles or so -- a sub-race called the Ultra Marathon - might be a real possibility in 2014. Here are the basic specs:

 

LOA = 18' 10"

Beam of center hull at sheer = 26"

Beam of center hull at waterline = 26"

Beam folded = 7' 4"

Beam open = 14' 8"

Sail rig options = Range from a unirig of 102 sq. ft up to a sloop rig of 160 sq. ft.

Weight all up = approx 230 lbs.

 

Basically, the hull on this 19-footer is a nearly exact copy of the hull on Laura's boat, but 15% bigger in every dimension (for details of Laura's boat, click here). Why? Because Laura's boat might just be the "perfect" all around hull design for a small tri, especially if it has to launch and sail in shallow water. And even in this 15% larger version, this hull will float in 3" of water and will sail -- upwind -- in 6".

 

The maiden voyage was made with my smallest sail option, a single sail of 102 sq. ft. on an unstayed mast.

Although this boat is just 3' longer than the 16' boat I mist often sail, it is a big step forward on seaworthiness and comfort. And this was actually the first of my tris to hit 14 mph - even with that single small sail.

 

But it was clear that a bigger rig would be needed to be able to enjoy good performance in moderate wind, which I suspected in advance. That's why I designed this 19-footer from the outset to be able use both stayed and unstayed rigs.

 

And boy, what a performance difference with the bigger sloop rig! Much more speed in lighter air, and it also points better and tacks faster. The downside, of course, is that it takes a lot longer to rig, and now there's a jib to deal with. Well, you get what you rig for...

 

Here below are more than 75 photos showing everything from flat plywood panels (3mm lauan) to happy sailing!

 

 

1

I got smart this time and glued in the supports for the 3 bulkheads while the sides were still horizontal.

 

2

As always, just bend the plywood until it's the shape of the boat you want!

 

3.

 

Then add enough braces to hold the desired shape.

 

5

These crossbraces are mostly temporary, just to hold the hull to the right width until the bottom plywood panels go on.

 

6

 

7

The best way to get the exact shape you want is with these partial station moulds.

 

8

 

9

The alignment of the bottom panel is critical - if it is wrong, the entire hull will be misaligned.

 

10

 

11

Next the "bilge" panels go on.

 

12

Most of the temporary station moulds have been removed.

 

13

 

14

 

15

All of the bulkheads are removed.

 

16

 

17

 

18

The bottom and bilge panels get a layer of 4-oz. fiberglass.

 

19

 

20

Now the entire hull has been covered in 6-oz. fiberglass.

 

21

Amazing the contours you can get with a sculpt-able medium.

22

You can see the limber holes in the permanent braces that will support the mast steps.

 

23

 

A layer of 6-oz glass goes in the cockpit.

 

Note that there are NO epoxy "fillets" anywhere on any of my boats.

Why? Because two layers of PL Premium do the job just as well!

 

24

 

The sides get 2 coats of polyurethane varnish.

 

   

25

 

Now the dual mast step is installed.

26

 

A better view...

 

27

 

The wood "rings" make it easier to get the masts in the step holes.

 

28

 

Now the two forward bulkheads get glued in - essential for preventing hull torquing.

 

 

 

 

29

Twin drain holes mean it will drain no matter which way it tilts.

 

30

A photo to help me remember how much "meat" is in the breasthook.

 

31

Some structural pieces are added to secure the step for the stayed mast and the cleats for the mainsheet.

32

The raise / lower lines for the rudder.

 

33

Same shot looking forward...

 

 

34

 

All these pieces need to be epoxy coated before painting, because this boat will be stored outdoors.

 

35

The ruder and cheeks being test-fitted.

 

36

Why is the rudder such a weird shape? Because that's what works best here in our shallow waters!

 

37

My most bullet-proof rudder yet!

 

 

 

38

 

 

39

Finally - the decks are on!

 

   

40

 

 

41

6 1/2 feet of uninterrupted open space, 26" wide between the sides.

 

42

The decks get glassed...

 

43

 

Hatch holes are laid out and the

mast partner is test-fitted.

 

44

 

   

45

A beach-impact skid will keep the fiberglass from wearing through.

   

46

 

 

   

47

The hull exterior and lots of bits and pieces are painted!

48

 

   

 

49

 

 

50

 

Really starting to look

like a boat now...

 

 

51

 

Openings are cut as needed...

 

52

 

53

 

 

 

54

 

It get some bling...

 

   

55

Twin leeboards! This baby will go upwind like gangbusters!

   

56

 

Looking really boaty now...

   

57

Cockpit controls are at hand...

 

58

 

The ruder gets a two-tone paint job.

 

   

 

59

The rudder-raise rope is visible, as are the steering ropes.

 

60

 

Magic ingredient - a movable seat that takes the steering pedals with it.

 

Why? So I can sit in any one of three places, and balance the boat with just me or with a passenger as well.

 

61

 

 

 

62

The "trick" mainsheet cam-cleat arrangement that lets it work from any angle.

 

63

 

A body could sleep here,

 if they really had to.

 

64

 

First test-assembly in the yard.

 

   

65

Looks kinda cool, I think...

   

66

 

But will it meet my expectations?

   

67

Time to find out - first test-sail.

 

68

 

So far, so good...

   

 

69

But...I'm just spoiled because my smaller tris are both "folders." So this 19-footer also has to become one.

 

70

 

Test-fitting the new parts prior to painting.

 

 

71

 

And here she is, a full-fledged folder!

 

The longitudinal pieces are to help keep the amas from stressing the aka connections, and to provide a strong attachment point for the shrouds when I use a stayed mast.

 

72

Folded: 7' 4" wide.

 

73

 

Open: 14' 8" wide.

 

74

On the beach, as a folder.

Also, about 2 1/2 feet wider than it used to be...

75

 

Test-fitting the sloop rig - for now, consisting of a Hobie 14 mainsail and a Laser II jib.

Totals about 150 sq ft.

 

76

Chuck Leinwebber (of Duckworks.com fame) stops by to check out my four current trimarans.

The next day he will start (and soon thereafter will finish) the 2013 Everglades Challenge!

 

77

Doesn't look nervous, does he?

Nah, he's an old hand at that stuff!

 

 

78

 

And finally, here is a short YouTube video demonstrating how the rudder on this

19 footer (and on all my other tris) is lowered and raised remotely - which

can be incredibly convenient!  http://youtu.be/asImSppBf0s

 

 

   

 

 

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